Tag Archives: student-centered

Getting Students to Take Responsibility for Their Learning

– Paul Woodburne About a year or so ago I came across Learner Centered Teaching: five key changes to practice that will foster student engagement by Maryellen Weimer (2013).  It was the idea of ‘fostering engagement’ that got me.  I … Continue reading

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Adulting 101

– Jeanne M. Slattery When I write a syllabus, I usually identify course goals such as critical thinking, application of theory, oral and written communication skills, career development, and information literacy. I don’t say that I want to prepare my … Continue reading

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Inquiry Seminars: Am I Teaching?

– Paul Woodburne In the fall of 2018, I taught my first Inquiry Seminar on computer games.  I first discussed this class some years ago when Shannon Nix was still here.  Usually when I start a class in a 15-week … Continue reading

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Jenga

– Jeanne M. Slattery I walked into my Introduction to Counseling class last semester and, after doing announcements about upcoming assignments, set up a game of Jenga. I didn’t introduce it, didn’t say what we were doing or why. I … Continue reading

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Reflections on Discussion-Based Classrooms

– Melissa K. Downes When I was being interviewed for my job here at Clarion, one of my soon-to-be colleagues asked me what I would do if no one talked in my classes. I told him I found it difficult … Continue reading

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Student-centered and Teacher-centered Classrooms

– Jeanne M. Slattery I used this John Francis TED talk below in my freshman inquiry seminar, Living Life Well, because it raised interesting questions about wellness. Was Francis well? By what definitions? He didn’t talk for 17 years – … Continue reading

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Syllabus by Design: Writing With the Student in Mind

– Ellen Foster Teachers of writing emphasize the importance of audience to their students. But do we teachers pay enough attention to audience when we’re writing our syllabi? Our syllabi, of course, have multiple audiences: our students, our peer evaluators, … Continue reading

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